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Learn About Guitars!

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Learn About Guitars!

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So this article will tell you about how a guitar works, and what types of guitars there are. Remember, this is only a small portion of guitars that exist. There are many, many, many other types of guitars out there that don’t all fit into this article.

So first, this is how a guitar works. The Pickups, is what picks up the vibrations from the strings (hence the name) Then, that vibration is transferred into electrical signals sent through a cable down to the amp. Then the amp plays it but you can add distortion by changing the frequency of the electrical signals. See below for diagram:

Diagram:

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Guitars:

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Les Paul (LP)

First made in 1952, however was only made as a goldtop version. In 1957 some person at Gibson invented humbucker pickups (originally made to get rid of hum that single coil pickups made). They got a patent for them and since then they call the pickups in the first Les Pauls PAF (patent applied for). They are part of the vintage tone that people like Jimmy Page or Eric Clapton are known for. In my opinion the best Les Pauls come from 1959. Have a very punch you in the face sort of sound with the right amp. Good for blues, classic rock, rhythm and blues, hard rock and maybe heavy metal if pickups are changed. Named after guitarist Les Paul who helped design it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gibson_Les_Paul

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Les Paul Jr. (LPJ)

Cheaper and simpler version of the normal Les Paul. Most of the time it has just one pickup that is a P-90 (the Gibson single coil pickup) that has a very unique sound like the PAF style humbuckers. Most LPJ’s have just one pickup however there are some with 2. Sometimes you can find a double cutaway version. Most artists who used this have customised this in one way or another. P-90s have a slightly brighter and sharper tone than humbuckers. Good for hard rock, maybe classic rock.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gibson_Les_Paul_Junior

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SG

Made to replace the Les Paul (originally the SG was called Les Paul SG, but the guitarist Les Paul after which the guitar was named after told Gibson to take his name off it), which it did for about 5 years, but then the Les Paul came back because players like Jimmy Page, Eric Clapton and Peter Green were playing them and people wanted them. Also has humbuckers. There is also an SG Jr. which I will not go to detail about as it is basically a LPJ, but SG. P-90 versions also available. Good for blues, classic rock, psychedelic rock rhythm and blues, hard rock and maybe heavy metal if pickups are changed. Mostly it is cheaper than LPs.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gibson_SG

 

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ES-330/ES-335/ES-336/ES-339

The guitars listed above are practically variations of the ES-335; they only differ by small changes, such as pickups (P-90s or Humbuckers) or minor size and shape differences. Unlike the LP and SG, solid body guitars, this is a semi hollow body guitar, meaning there is space inside it. Good for any genre you can think of (except maybe polka).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gibson_ES-335

http://www.gibson.com/News-Lifestyle/Features/en-us/Top-10-Gibson-ES-335-Heroes.aspx

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Flying V and Explorer

Both the Flying V and the Explorer were brought in the late 50s by Gibson when they wanted to add new guitars to the catalog. There are no Jr. versions for either of them. Mostly cheaper than LPs. Both are made with humbuckers, but at some point someone must have made a version with P-90s. Both guitars are very good for rock and metal music in general. The Flying V is also very good for blues music. The irish blues guitarist Gary Moore used an explorer at one point.

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Stratocaster (Strat)

The first solid body electric guitar to be made. They are almost always made with three single coil pickups, however some models with humbuckers can be found. The guitar is very good for clean tones, maybe slightly overdriven tones. The exception to this was Jimi Hendrix who turned most amplifier settings up to full, and still sounded great. Very good for blues music. Could work with classic rock. Fender offers this thing where you can design your strat.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fender_Stratocaster

Now you know a little bit about guitars and types of guitars. Again, this is only a small portion of the guitars that exist, but these are the main ones.

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